Saturday, January 26, 2013

Creating in the style of Andy Goldsworthy (Part II)

In continuing our exploration of the work of Andy Goldsworthy, the students created projects illustrating the ephemeral quality found in some of his work. The artist often used brightly colored flowers, petals, leaves, pine cones, stones, twigs and mud. 

The students collected a variety of material and created compositions
emphasizing the beauty found in nature. The artist explains why he takes photographs of his projects. 

He writes: "My approach to photograph is kept simple, almost routine. All work good and bad, is documented. I use standard film, a standard lens and no filters. Each work grows, strays,  decays- integral parts of a cycle which the photograph shows its height, marking the moment when the work is most alive. There is an intensity about a work at its peak that I hope is expresses in the image. Process and decay are implicit."  

In following the example of Andy Goldsworth, the students took pictures of their work and gathered all the material from nature in containers for future projects.  

Our nature trail offered a plethora of twigs and gum balls

Students collaborated in finding the desired material for their project.

It was impressive to watch students assisting each other when choosing materials for their design.

Concentrating and paying attention to detail.

Each student was responsible for one set of material; however, they were more than
willing to share with their  fellow artists.

Walking around looking at each other's work and offering constructive criticism.

Student comment: "My butterfly will not be heavy in my photograph."

Learning how to collaborate was an essential part of this project

Accepting the fact that taking turns cleaning our classroom can be creative, too.